Children Learn What They Live

Source: Children Learn What They Live By Dorothy Law Nolte, Ph.D.

If children live with criticism, they learn to condemn.

 


If children live with hostility, they learn to fight.
If children live with fear, they learn to be apprehensive.

 


If children live with pity, they learn to feel sorry for themselves.

If children live with ridicule, they learn to feel shy.


If children live with jealousy, they learn to feel envy.

 

If children live with shame, they learn to feel guilty.
If children live with encouragement, they learn confidence.

 

 

If children live with tolerance, they learn patience.
If children live with praise, they learn appreciation.

 

 

If children live with acceptance, they learn to love.
If children live with approval, they learn to like themselves.

 

If children live with recognition, they learn it is good to have a goal.
If children live with sharing, they learn generosity.
If children live with honesty, they learn truthfulness.

 

 

If children live with fairness, they learn justice.
If children live with kindness and consideration, they learn respect.

 
 

 

 

If children live with security, they learn to have faith in themselves and in those about them.

 

 

 

 

If children live with friendliness, they learn the world is a nice place in which to live.

 

 

  

Developmental psychology, also known as human development, is the scientific study of systematic psychological changes, emotional changes, and perception changes that occur in human beings over the course of their life span. Originally concerned with infants and children, the field has expanded to include adolescence, adult development, aging, and the entire life span. This field examines change across a broad range of topics including motor skills and other psycho-physiological processes; cognitive development involving areas such as problem solving, moral understanding, and conceptual understanding; language acquisition; social, personality, and emotional development; and self-concept and identity formation.

Developmental psychology includes issues such as the extent to which development occurs through the gradual accumulation of knowledge versus stage-like development, or the extent to which children are born with innate mental structures versus learning through experience. Many researchers are interested in the interaction between personal characteristics, the individual’s behavior, and environmental factors including social context, and their impact on development; others take a more narrowly focused approach.

Developmental psychology informs several applied fields, including: educational psychology, child psychopathology, and forensic developmental psychology. Developmental psychology complements several other basic research fields in psychology including social psychology, cognitive psychology, ecological psychology, and comparative psychology.

Read all in Developmental psychology From Wikipedia,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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