President Thein is heard going around every where telling that he is also just a pawn in the chess game but he must take responsibility for Ommission of Duty and Command Responsibility

ဂ်ပန္သတင္းေထာက္ Kenji Nagai ရဲ႔ ေနာက္ဆံုး ပံုရိပ္..
ေရႊ၀ါေရာင္သတင္းေထာက္ ကိုရန္နိုင္ သက္စြန္႔ဆံဖ်ား ရိုက္ကူးခဲ့တဲ႔ ဂ်ပန္သတင္းေထာက္ကို လုပ္ၾကံမႈ မွတ္တမ္း အေသးစိတ္..WATCH HERE IN FB

Than Shwe is responsible for shooting POINT BLANK this Japanese. We called COMMAND RESPONSIBILITY. After all his bluffing of STRAY BULLET made him guilty of trying to coverup the crime…

Like wise…Although STUPID PUPPET President Thein is heard going around every where telling that he is also just a pawn in the chess game and the unseen powerful forces or hands are creating the atrocities and massacres.

 

Even if U Thein Sein was just a pawn piece in Draughts [Kyar (Htoe) in Myanmar] he is already promoted to a King status. He must take the responsible duty.

Omission of Duty is an offense punishable at criminal courts.

And as the supreme commander of the country, President, he must be responsible to answer at ICC for the Genocide of Rohingyas and Ethnic Cleansing (could be rather called Religious Cleansing) of Muslims from Myanmar esp. from Meikhtila.

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4 Responses to “President Thein is heard going around every where telling that he is also just a pawn in the chess game but he must take responsibility for Ommission of Duty and Command Responsibility”

  1. drkokogyi Says:

    Command responsibility, sometimes referred to as the Yamashita standard or the Medina standard, and also known as superior responsibility, is the doctrine of hierarchical accountability in cases of war crimes.[1][2][3][4]

    The term may also be used more broadly to refer to the duty to supervise subordinates, and liability for the failure to do so, both in government, military law and with regard to corporations and trusts.

    The doctrine of “command responsibility” was established by the Hague Conventions (IV) and (X) of 1907 and was applied for the first time by the German Supreme Court in Leipzig after World War I, in the 1921 trial of Emil Müller.[5][6][7]

    The “Yamashita standard” is based upon the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita. He was prosecuted in 1945, in a still controversial trial, for atrocities committed by troops under his command in the Philippines during World War II. Yamashita was charged with “unlawfully disregarding and failing to discharge his duty as a commander to control the acts of members of his command by permitting them to commit war crimes”.[8][9]

    The “Medina standard” is based upon the 1971 prosecution of U.S. Army Captain Ernest Medina in connection with the My Lai Massacre during the Vietnam War.[10] It holds that a commanding officer, being aware of a human rights violation or a war crime, will be held criminally liable when he does not take action. READ MORE HERE>>>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Command_responsibility

  2. drkokogyi Says:

    Omission Of Duty…
    In the criminal law, an omission, or failure to act, will constitute an actus reus (Latin for “guilty act”) and give rise to liability only when the law imposes a duty to act and the defendant is in breach of that duty….

    Preventing and prosecuting war crimes

    Following the Nuremberg Trials international law developed the concept of command responsibility. It holds that military commanders are imposed with individual responsibility for war crimes, committed by forces under their effective command and control, they failed to prevent or adequately prosecute, if they:

    “either knew or, owing to the circumstances at the time, should have known that the forces were committing or about to commit such crimes.”[2][3][4] READ MORE HERE>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omission_%28criminal_law%29#Preventing_and_prosecuting_war_crimes

  3. drkokogyi Says:

    Japan inquiry into reporter death

    Mr Nagai was shot as he filmed a protest in Rangoon

    Enlarge Image
    Japan is sending its deputy foreign minister to Burma to investigate the death of a Japanese journalist, who was covering the anti-government protests.

    Japan said it would review its aid programmes to Burma over the fatal shooting of Kenji Nagai on Thursday.

    TV footage has emerged which raises the possibility that the 50-year-old may have been deliberately targeted rather than caught in police cross-fire.

    Japan’s PM, Yasuo Fukuda, said he would decide how to proceed after the visit.

    “We will have to think carefully to figure out what is the best thing to do – what is the best choice for Japan.”

    By sending Mitoji Yabunaka to Burma, he said Japan would “find the way to solve this issue and to make further decisions. Sanctions are not the best step to take now.”

    Japanese journalist Kenji Nagai
    Kenji Nagai had experience of working in dangerous places
    He has described Mr Nagai’s death as “really deplorable”.

    Japan is a leading aid donor to Burma and has been criticised for failing to take a tougher line against the regime.

    Tokyo has withheld some aid from Burma since pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi was detained in 2003.

    But it funds emergency and humanitarian projects on a case-by-case basis, and is one of the military regime’s significant trading partners.

    Investigation calls

    Mr Nagai, an experienced journalist who had worked in many dangerous parts of the world, was killed near the Sule pagoda, which has been a focal point for several of the demonstrations.

    Monks pass a burning motorcycle in Rangoon on 26 September
    Monks and ordinary people have been protesting for days

    Japanese TV has been running footage which appears to show a government soldier shooting the journalist at close range.

    Mr Nagai, who was working for the Tokyo-based APF network, is seen falling to the ground still carrying his camera as a soldier points a rifle right in front of him.

    Japanese embassy doctors have confirmed that he was killed by a bullet to the chest.

    ”Whether [the shooting] was intentional and whether it was from a point-blank range remains to be investigated,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Nobutaka Machimura said. Source>>>http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7017636.stm

  4. drkokogyi Says:

    Committee to Protect Journalists
    Kenji Nagai
    APF News
    September 27, 2007, in Rangoon, Burma

    Nagai, 50, who was working for the Tokyo-based video and photo agency APF News, was killed by Burmese troops cracking down on antigovernment demonstrations in Rangoon, according to official Japanese state-run television.

    Nagai appeared to be deliberately targeted by a Burmese soldier, according to video footage shown on Japan’s Fuji News Network. The footage shows Nagai filming near a group of demonstrators before being pushed to the ground and shot at near point-blank range. The Japanese embassy in Burma confirmed the killing and said that the path of the bullet through Nagai’s body was inconsistent with Burmese authorities’ claims that Nagai died as a result of a stray shot.

    The journalist had entered Burma just three days before, according to media reports.

    According to the Burma Media Association and Burmese exile-run news sources, the military government disconnected nearly all mobile phone services in Rangoon on September 27. The cuts took place at 3 p.m., coinciding with the time when security forces confronted and opened fire on Buddhist monk demonstrators at Sule Pagoda in central Rangoon.

    Ten people were killed in the September 27 crackdown, according to the government; diplomatic sources cited in news reports said the death toll was higher.

    Troops were seen clearing demonstrators from the streets, telling protestors to leave within 10 minutes before they would open fire.

    Medium: Print, Television

    Job: Camera Operator, Photographer

    Beats Covered: Human Rights, Politics

    Gender: Male

    Local or Foreign: Foreign

    Freelance: No

    Type of Death: Dangerous Assignment

    Suspected Source of Fire: Military Officials

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