DOUBLE TALK BY the MINISTRY OF HEALTH MALAYSIA and Pharmaceutical Association

DOUBLE TALK BY the MINISTRY OF HEALTH MALAYSIA and Pharmaceutical Association >>>

1/ I have never seen (my own experience) at government hospital dispensaries or at the private pharmacies…the PHARMACISTS explaining the side effects and details of the medicines BUT just rushed through telling 1 Tab three times after food etc.

2/The myth that only pharmacists dispense medication in government hospitals as it is safe should be corrected. The in-patients in a government or private hospital are dispensed medication in the wards by the doctors and nurses.

Hardly do we see pharmacists in the wards.Why is safety of dispensing particularly important to out-patients and not in-patients? Going by the logic that doctors don’t have the sufficient knowledge to dispense medication, don’t the in-patients, the the wards of hospitals, have a right to have their medications dispensed to them by a professional also?

3) Of late we have heard of having your medications posted/couriered to patients. This is to ease the burden of the patient, who has to come to the government facility to collect his/her medication, to enhance patient compliance to medication and for patient convenience.

Who in this case dispenses the medication? Is it the professional courier van driver or is there a pharmacist on tow in the courier van?

After all it is sure that Pharmacists and Ministry of Health just giving LAME EXCUSES to rob the rights of the GPs.

Hospitals practise dispensing integration

I REFER to the letter “Solution can be mapped out” (The Star, Feb 28) by Datuk Nancy Ho, president of the Malaysian Pharmaceutical Society (MPS), who said that there are 13,000 pharmacists in the country currently and their services have yet to be tapped and hence dispensing separation is inevitable as the numbers are sufficient.

I wish to pose three questions to the MPS president as well as other pharmacists.

1) The MPS has many times highlighted that dispensing separation is practised in government hospitals, public health clinics and private hospitals. However, this is only partially true.

Government and private hospitals as well as government health clinics have integrated the roles of the pharmacists into their systems to serve the patients as one unit under one roof. They do not practise dispensing separation but more correctly dispensing integration.

However, when some speak of dispensing separation, what they mean is for the patient to see the doctor and then collect the medicines at another facility away from the clinic.

This could inconvenience and increase the cost for the patient which could indirectly affect the compliance of the patient to medication.

Government and private hospitals practise dispensing integration, where the patient sees the doctor in the same facility and leaves the same facility with his medication dispensed by the pharmacist.

If ever patient safety is a cause of concern and if ever it is true that patient accessibility and affordability is a concern, the role of the pharmacist should be integrated into the private primary health facility and not separated.

2. The myth that only pharmacists dispense medication in government hospitals as it is safe should be corrected. The in-patients in a government or private hospital are dispensed medication in the wards by the doctors and nurses.

Hardly do we see pharmacists in the wards.

Why is safety of dispensing particularly important to out-patients and not in-patients? Going by the logic that doctors don’t have the sufficient knowledge to dispense medication, don’t the in-patients, the the wards of hospitals, have a right to have their medications dispensed to them by a professional also?

3) Of late we have heard of having your medications posted/couriered to patients. This is to ease the burden of the patient, who has to come to the government facility to collect his/her medication, to enhance patient compliance to medication and for patient convenience.

Who in this case dispenses the medication? Is it the professional courier van driver or is there a pharmacist on tow in the courier van?

These are probably some of the areas the 13,000 pharmacists services could be used and further enhanced.

Let’s be truthful to ourselves and let’s transform to lessen the burden of the sick, not to make things more difficult, complicated and expensive than it already is.

DR RAJ KUMAR MAHARAJAH

Putrajaya

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: